Have These STEM Students Found the Solution to Big City Traffic?

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There aren’t many problems in the world that can’t be solved with the help of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). In fact, we can’t even begin to tackle some of the world’s biggest challenges without the help of experts in STEM fields. And yet, by 2030, Europe is on course to produce just 8 percent(1) of the world’s STEM graduates.

In an energy company like ExxonMobil, STEM skills are at the heart of everything we do. Supporting STEM education is hugely important to us – and the Sci-Tech Challenge is one of our pan-European programmes.

Organized in association with JA Europe, the competition challenges students across Europe to use their STEM skills to solve some of the biggest challenges facing society. This year’s challenge? How to tackle big city traffic. Find out what our 2019 finalists from Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands and Romania came up with in the film below:

Launched in 2010, the Sci-Tech Challenge is designed to motivate students aged 15-18 to consider STEM-oriented careers, raise their awareness of the importance of STEM skills, and see first-hand how they can be applied in enterprising ways.

“The reason we choose city congestion for this year’s challenge is firstly because it’s something many of us have to face,” explained Nikolaas Baeckelmans, chairman of the 2019 jury and ExxonMobil’s VP of EU Affairs. “And secondly because it matches perfectly with what we try to achieve with this competition – asking students to find practical solutions to fundamental societal challenges, using science and technology.”

The Sci-Tech Challenge has so far involved more than 1,500 volunteers from ExxonMobil and engaged over 45,000 students. This year’s final was hosted by Ambassador Luminita Odobescu, Permanent Representative of Romania on the Council of the European Union – with ‘Connecting Education’ a key theme of Romania’s 2019 presidency of the council.

“The Sci-Tech Challenge is a great opportunity to give students an interesting way to learn, and to help them discover careers in STEM,” said Philippe Ducom, President of ExxonMobil Europe, during the final. “For ExxonMobil it’s not only a competition, it’s a pipeline for new talent!”

 

Sources:

  1. OECD: Education Indicators in Focus
Tags:   JA EuropeLuminita OdobescuNikolaas BaeckelmansPhilippe DucomRomanian Presidency of the Council of the European UnionSci-Tech ChallengeSTEMSTEM careersSTEM Education
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